$1m a month spent in deprived communities on pokie machines

A new report has found pokies machines in small venues don’t offer the checks against problem gambling as those in casinos.

The Department of Internal Affairs employed a mystery shopper strategy using actors displaying the traits of problem gamblers.

Anthony Hawke, the Maori public health manager at Hapai Te Hauora, says the result was an indictment on the laws that allow the machines to go into bars and smaller clubs which don’t have the software and trained host responsibility staff available to larger venues.

Small pokie venues disappoint in mystery shopper report by DIA

This week the Department of Internal Affairs released the results of the "mystery shopper" audit of pokie venues. Casinos and smaller clubs and societies known as 'Class 4' venues were visited by actors trained to mimic problem gambling behaviour. The interactions with staff were evaluated to test venue compliance against regulatory requirements.

Hāpai te Hauora brings collective indigenous voice against cultural appropriation

In January 2017 Hāpai Te Hauora was alerted to the presence of an online gaming product called 'Maori' created by international software company Endorphina Ltd. The game includes images of tāne and wahine Māori, waka, pounamu, stylised bone carvings and a rendition of the haka Ka Mate. 

Online gaming company commodifies Māori culture for gambling revenue

Hāpai Te Hauora is deeply concerned to learn of a new online gambling site targeting Māori and using shameful cultural rip-offs.

Endorphina Games has launched an online slot game called 'Maori' using imagery which is blatant cultural appropriation including images of wahine and tāne Māori, pounamu and stylised bone carvings.

Endorphina, an online gaming company based in the Czech Republic, claims their game is a "celebration of cultural heritage" from New Zealand.

Hāpai Te Hauora supports calls for more light to be shed on gaming environments

A recent television media interview for TVNZ's Seven Sharp was titled "Time to stop dimming the lights? Gaming rooms are designed to fuel addiction". University of Auckland Professor Peter Adams has specialist expertise in addiction, and he raised concerns about the potential of gaming environments in New Zealand to create and reinforce behaviour which leads to problem gambling.

Dollars and Sense - Community Action to Address Problem Gambling

Hāpai Te Hauora, the voice for community action on the Minimisation and Prevention of Gambling Harm, are calling for decision makers to ensure money is returned to those communities who are contributing the most to pokie machines revenue. This will ensure communities with higher numbers of pokie machines are better resourced to combat the social issues created by the generating of funding for the nation.